• Honey

    What is Clover Honey?

    If you buy honey at the grocery store, you may notice that some bottles are labeled “Clover Honey”.  Clover honey is the most commonly available honey in the US.  But, what exactly is clover honey? And how does it differ from other types of honey?  What is Clover Honey? As you can probably guess, clover honey is produced by bees that primarily forage on clover plants. Bees collect nectar from clover flowers and then use the nectar to make honey. Clover plants produce a lot of nectar, making them a favorite of honey bees.  Clover is the common name for plants of the genus Trifolium. It is in the pea…

  • Beekeeping

    When to Requeen a Hive

    The queen is the most important bee in the hive.  She is the only one that lays eggs, and therefore is responsible for the growth of the colony.  Sometimes the beekeeper will decide that the queen needs to be replaced.  This is called requeening a hive.  There are a few reasons why requeening should occur. For example, when a queen gets older, she may not be as efficient at laying eggs.  Sometimes requeening a weak hive is necessary for the colony’s survival.  But how do you know when to requeen a hive?  Read on to find out.  When to Requeen a Hive A hive should not be requeened without good…

  • Beehives,  Beekeeping

    Beekeeping With Horizontal Hives

    While not as common in the US, Horizontal hives are used a lot in Europe. Lately, this type of beehive has been gaining interest, as it is a simple hive that work with natural beekeeping methods. Horizontal hives also work great for backyard and urban beekeepers. There are 3 different types of horizontal hives.  The top bar, horizontal or long langstroth hive, and the Layens hive.  This article will talk about the different horizontal hives, compare them to the langstroth, and list some horizontal hives for sale.   What is a Horizontal Hive? While Langstroth hives are vertically stacked boxes, horizontal hives are single story hives that expand the width of…

  • Beekeeping Supplies,  Honey

    How to Clean a Honey Extractor

    Now that you learned how to use a honey extractor, the next step is cleaning and maintaining it.  Buying a honey extractor can be a bit of an investment, so I’m sure you want to take good care of it.  A properly maintained honey extractor can last for years.   After harvesting honey you will see that your extractor has a lot of sticky residue all over it’s sides.  It is important to clean this residue so your honey extractor can work properly next time. Read on to learn how to clean a honey extractor.  How to Clean a Honey Extractor Removing the residual honey can be a bit messy and…

  • Beekeeping,  Honey

    How to Use a Honey Extractor

    It’s what beekeepers look forward to all year – harvesting honey.  If you have top bar hives, you will use the crush and strain method.  But if you have Langstroth hives, you probably want to use a honey extractor.  Honey extractors spin the frames and comb, using centrifugal force to remove the honey from the comb. The honey then collects at the bottom of the extractor’s drum.  The drum has a tap that drains the honey into a container of your choice. Using a honey extractor is a huge time saver, as several frames can be spun at once.  Another benefit of using a honey extractor is that the wax…

  • Solitary Bees

    10 Interesting Facts About the Leafcutter Bee

    Leafcutter bees (also known as leafcutting bees) are scientifically known as Megachile Latreille. They are in one of the largest genera of bees, with more than 1500 species in over 50 subgenera. Other bees in this family include mason bees, resin bees, and carder bees. They get their nickname from what they do – cut leaves. Female leafcutter bees will line a cavity with leaves to create a brood chamber in which to lay her eggs. The baby leafcutter bees stay in the chamber throughout winter. In the spring, they chew through the chamber to exit the nest. Female leafcutter bees have teeth. They also have large heads due to the…

  • Beekeeping

    Powdered Sugar Treatment for Varroa Mites

    While the Varroa mite may be tiny, it can cause a lot of damage to a honey bee colony.  Beekeepers must be diligent in monitoring and treating Varroa mites in their hives.  There are a few different methods for detecting and treating Varroa mite infestation.  Powdered sugar treatment for Varroa mites is a good way to treat hives because it is chemical free and does not kill any bees.  What are Varroa Mites? Varroa mites are parasitic mites that attach to the bee and feed on their fat bodies. They feed and live on adult honey bees, larvae, and pupae.  Varroa mites can wreak havoc in a beehive, causing viruses…

  • Beekeeping Supplies

    Where to Buy Beekeeping Suits

    The bee suit is a super important part of beekeeping.  It’s the thing that keeps beekeepers safe from bee stings.  While some beekeepers prefer to tend to their hives without protective gear, it really depends on the temperament of the bees. Most beekeepers should wear a beekeeping suit, veil, and protective gloves when around their beehives.  New beekeepers often wonder where to buy beekeeping suits?  It’s not something that is usually sold in stores. The best way to get a bee suit is to order one online.   Types of Beekeeping Suits Beekeeping Jacket Also called a beekeeping smock, this type of bee suit provides protection only to your upper body. …

  • Beekeeping

    How Often Should You Inspect a Beehive?

    Beehive inspections are important because without them, you would have no idea what is going on inside of the hive. If you do not inspect your hives periodically, there is a good chance that your bees will not survive very long.   However, inspecting your hives too much is a problem as well.  The bees don’t necessarily like to be disturbed, and too much of it is very stressful for them.  So, how often should you inspect a beehive?   What is a Beehive Inspection? A beehive inspection is a routine check up of the bee colony.  Hive inspections are important because if there is something wrong in the hive, such as…

  • Solitary Bees

    Foster A Mason Bee

    If you’ve ever thought about raising mason bees, or if you already do, this special may be of interest to you. Since it’s the end of the season, Crown Bees is working to find homes for all of their mason bees. To do this, they are having a special where you can get 20 mason bee cocoons for only $19.95. This is a great deal, as the normal price is $32.95. Not only that, all cocoons will be shipped for free via FedEx 2 day shipping. The bees will be shipped out on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, so plan accordingly. Crown Bee’s Foster a Mason Bee sale starts now, and…